Metta World Peace opens up on eve of NBA Finals

Sports
Artest Croshere

FILE – In this Nov. 19, 2004, file photo, Indiana Pacers’ Ron Artest, now known as Metta World Peace, is restrained by teammate Austin Croshere and Pacers assistant coach Mike Brown before being escorted off the court following their fight with the Detroit Pistons and fans in Auburn Hills, Mich. Metta World Peace needed to win a championship ring so his career wasn’t defined only by one angry moment in Detroit. (AP Photo/Duane Burleson, File)

Metta World Peace is happy, something he wasn’t during most of his time in the NBA. He’s also at peace with himself, he tells PodcastOne Sports Now , after rescuing both his career and his life with therapy that helped him overcome the stigma of the 2004 brawl in Detroit that became known as “Malice at the Palace.”

The former Ron Artest joins co-hosts Tim Dahlberg and Jim Litke to talk about his career and his life after, and whether the 2010 Lakers he played on could have beaten the current Golden State Warriors.

World Peace credits intense therapy with helping him shed his anger and become not only a better person but a much better teammate. And he looks at the championship he won in Los Angeles at the defining moment of his career, not the brawl in Detroit that cost him $5 million, a one-year suspension and the scorn of fans everywhere.

The hosts also preview the NBA playoffs with Tim Reynolds, NBA writer for The Associated Press. And they talk soft food and why scrambled eggs might be the perfect food.

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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