NORFOLK, Va. (WAVY) — It’s world breastfeeding week and the American Academy of Pediatrics recently issued new breastfeeding recommendations.

According to the AAP, it’s best to nurse your child until they are two years old or beyond.

This falls in line with what the World Health Organization has always recommended. Dr. Suzanne Brixey with the Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters (CHKD) says nursing until two increases health benefits for both baby and mom.

Doctors coming out in support of it will also help de-stigmatize it for women who may have felt ashamed breastfeeding toddlers.

“The evidence is showing there has been some public shaming for families who wanted to continue breastfeeding beyond a year and we’re like, we’re here to support families,” Dr. Bixey said.

Mom Kelsey Augusta told 10 On Your Side she sometimes gets looks or comments from people when they hear she is still nursing her almost two-year-old son, Levi, but she doesn’t let it bother her. She’s glad to hear about the new AAP recommendation.

“It’s just, it’s nice to have that to back me up,” said Kelsey.

More than a third of breastfeeding moms are afraid to tell their pediatrician that they’re still breastfeeding beyond one year, Dr. Brixey told 10 On Your Side.

“The evidence is showing there has been some public shaming for families who wanted to continue breastfeeding beyond a year and we’re like, ‘we’re here to support families’,” she said.

Dr. Brixey said that is one reason the AAP updated its recommendation. That, and the increased health benefits for baby and mom.

“When we have an opportunity to decrease maternal diabetes, decrease hypertension, decrease breast cancer, ovarian cancer, we want to support those efforts for our families,” said Dr. Brixey.

But families may still struggle with policies that fall short of that support.

“There are legal ramifications that support you for your pumping journey when you go back to work,” Chesapeake Regional Lactation Consultant, Jessica Williams said.

Breaktime laws allow working moms time to pump and Family leave laws (FMLA) also provide time to care for newborns, but are not always paid.

Augusta says if we really want to support families, those need to change. “100% I think that that is something that we are still lagging on in this country.”

Chesapeake Regional has Lactation consultants and support groups.

A Breastfeeding medicine program at CHKD is also available to support families.