Intern Reflection: Web Development

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This week was really interesting. In addition to writing real stories for HRScene, doing a few Local News stories for Kevin, curating/posting the “Strange News” section, and reformatting AP content, I got the awesome opportunity to learn more about website development. I got to learn a whole new platform, and lots of real, marketable skills. I’d done a little bit of site development before, but I’d never had the opportunity to work on something so important. Jane was kind enough to take the time to train me in it, and I got to go through and work on a section of the site. Websites are like organisms, and if one thing goes wrong or is out of place, then the whole thing stops working. It is really interesting how dynamic and complicated they are. It was… actually almost stressful, which was awesome, cause I’d really, really been looking forward to doing something fast-paced and feeling like I was helping in an important way. Working on the website was probably- well, maybe- the most career-relevant set of skills I got to learn, and I learned to be careful, to be thorough, and to do things consciously and precisely, but also quickly- because deadlines are not optional, and you will do everything you can to make them.

It was a really good week, and I feel like I got more out of this week than I have any other (it also felt really good to be back after Spring Break, and for work to be a welcome change of pace from school life). I’ve started working more hours because the longer I stay, the more opportunities there are for me to do interesting work. I learned that the cohesive, functional interfaces and technologies we use daily- while they feel effortless and natural to us- are truly the work of a few very skilled, very hard-working people.

Is this post lackluster? Yes.

Have I been awake for almost 24 hours? Yes.

But did I do this blog post? Yes. Most of all, yes. Yes I did.

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